Norfolk & Southern TRACK-REPAIR

Thirteen graphics on this page. They should load while you read. Load time may vary depending on your computer speed and the speed of your internet connection.

This page is dedicated to all the people who remember singing the song in School,"I been working on the RAILROAD."
These guys really did work on this section of track,"all the live long day,". They started at about 9:00 AM and finished around 6:00 PM.
Since I am an underemployed WEBGUY, I used my spare time to document the process as best I could. So, on August 19, 2003, I was," working on the RAILROAD, just to pass my time away."

ERRORS AND OMMISSIONS EXEMPTED.

The objective of this page is an attempt to chronologically record the procession of machinery used to remove old ties and insert new ties on the section of tracks across the street from 22 North Main Street, Phillipsburg, New Jersey.

To the best of my knowledge, the repair job began in June 2003 when piles of new RAILROAD ties were dropped along the tracks, I counted more than sixty. Then in July 2003 new gray stones were lined on both sides of the tracks. Finally, August 19, 2003 the repair crew arrived and started working. When I noticed, I ran and found my camera. Some say I need a life, However; I enjoy my current life, Thank-you very much.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW an awesome TKO TIE REMOVER-INSERTER

This is the progression of machinery

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As was learned in Industrial Management class, a large percentage of the work is done to handle material, the less the empoloyee needs to touch the material, the more efficiently the job progresses. Therefore: most of the heavy work is done by specialty machinery to properly position the work material.

This TIE CRANE straightened predelivered ties along pre marked replacement ties.

TIE CRANE-HANDLER

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brusher-blower

The second machine seemed to be a brusher of some sort. There is a protective skirt all around the bottom and dust flew everywhere.

The third machine in line was a SPIKE PULLER. The spikes were extracted and they became attached to big magnetized wheels and collected in a bin on the front of the cart.

SPIKE PULLER

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DIGGER

The fourth machine was a DIGGER that seemed to be loosening ground around the ties that were going to be removed.



The fifth machine in line seemed to be the hardest worker. This machine used big claws to dig on each side of the tie to be pulled. It then lifted the tracks and it shimmied and pulled the tie out from under the tracks. And it then left the tie and loose dirt laying next to the tracks.

Two workers followed this machine. One person shovelled tie splinters off the tracks and another moved plates closer to where they would be reused.

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TKO-tie-remover-inserter

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ANOTHER CRANE TIE MOVER

The sixth machine was the same type machine as the first machine, but it had a different fuction. This CRANE lifted the tie that was removed by the fifth machine and this crane piled the ties along the tracks.

ANOTHER CRANE TIE MOVER

LOOK CLOSE   I placed these two pictures right over and under each other. The seventh machine was the same machine as the sixth machine, but it had a different fuction. This CRANE moved the new tie into place so it could be inserted under the tracks. Do you notice the difference? Machine # Six has two carts and Machine # Seven has only one cart.

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The eighth machine was another TKO TIE REMOVER-INSERTER. This time the ties were being inserted.

TIE-INSERTER
WORK AREA IS CLEANED, SIMILAR TO MACHINE #2

The ninth machine cleaned the work area similar to machine #2. It seemed to brush excess stones and dirt off the work area.

The tenth machine lifted the tracks high enough so the plate could be placed on top of the new tie.

PLATE-INSERTER

Here we go again with two machines following each other and performing very similar tasks. (SOUND FAMILIAR?) The eleventh machine was a SPIKE DRIVER. The new spikes being loaded into the conveyor mechinism were bright gray metal.

SPIKE DRIVER #1

The twelveth machine was another SPIKE DRIVER. It seemed that each machine was inserting four spikes. The pictures are lined up again so you may compare.

SPIKE DRIVER #2
SPIKE picker-upper

The lucky thirteenth machine was a Spare Spike Picker-upper. This person followed the second spike driver and picked up loose spikes with a magnet on a stick.

I'll leave the process there. The next three machines that followed were concerned with cleaning up and leveling the tracks after the main procession.

The NEW tracks are smooth and sturdy. Trains that pass make almost no noise. The only noise heard is the sound of the WHISTLE before the train passes the intersection in Union Square, and the sound of the million horsepower engine as it rumbles past the building.

As promised, I'll start working on getting BEL-DEL Passenger service from Phillipsburg-to-Belvidere...

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It must be a DAN THING. Here's a page done in 1998 that explains the same process on the West Coast by Union Pacific. I found this page after construction of my own. DANSDEPOT CROSS TIE REPLACEMENT
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THIS SCREEN IS A TARGET WINDOW, IF YOU CLOSE THIS
SCREEN YOU WILL RETURN FROM WHERE YOU CAME.
Daniel Z. Seyler  © August 22, 2003